Archive for May, 2009

BOOK REVIEW: Cutting For Stone

Posted on May 25, 2009. Filed under: 1 |

Cutting For StoneCutting For Stone is a sweeping, outstanding epic. It is without question a book to be read, discussed and remembered. It is a work of fiction that blurs the fine line between imagination and reality. The author gives voice to the lead character, Marion Stone, who narrates this story, which seems as if it happens in real time but is actually a remembrance of his past. Marion is a conjoined twin to his brother, Shiva. Their mother is a nun of Indian heritage and their father a British surgeon. Their mother dies in childbirth and their father disappears. Meanwhile, Ethiopia is in the throes of revolution. However, it is passion rather than revolution that separates these twins.

We follow Marion and Shiva as they mature and make sense of the changes happening all around them. Step by step we see the twins both develop a love for medicine that will take them in very different directions when they both fall in love with the same woman. Marion flees to New York, but his past catches up with him and causes his life to be placed in the hands of those he trusts the least.

This book is about healing others with the power of medicine but also is very involved with love, betrayal, fate and honor. We become intimately connected with all the characters in this story and the emotions are powerful. I caught myself on the edge of my seat and reading until my eyes were burning. I also wanted to throw the book because I would get so mad at certain characters.

I unequivocally loved this book and it is one of the best I’ve read this year. I wanted to turn right around and read it again. I would certainly recommend it to others as being a book that goes the distance.

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BOOK REVIEW: Finding an Unseen God

Posted on May 19, 2009. Filed under: 1 |

Finding God

Finding an Unseen God: Reflections of a Former Atheist by Alicia Britt Chole is an honest read. It is designed to make people look deeply into their faith and see how it measures up. It is based on Alicia’s experiences as she changes in her beliefs. Alicia refers to herself “as a fierce realist who prefers unanswered questions over fairy tales.”

The chapters are short and based on a crossword puzzle theme so the chapters aren’t meant to be read in order. The style should appeal to young adults.

I found the books message to be one that is easily taken to heart and agreed with the foundation of principles that Alicia laid out to compare your belief system against the One True God. It held my interest and was worth the reading.

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BOOK REVIEW: Annie’s Ghosts

Posted on May 17, 2009. Filed under: 1 |

An unusual story about the forgotten.

An unusual story about the forgotten.

Annie’s Ghosts by Steve Luxenberg is an unusual, one-of-a-kind, compelling must read of the first order. The cover states it is a journey into a family secret. The secret begins when Steve’s mother, Bertha/Beth Luxenberg decides not to tell her husband to be that she had a disabled sister who was sent away to a mental institution. So begins a massive uncovering of the reasons for the secret and just who this sister was.

Steve visits doctors, hospitals, libraries, museums, courthouses, and government offices in his search for the truth. He tracks down family and friends and co-workers. He visits places that were meaningful in relationship to his mom. This journey at the very least gives a more thorough appreciation of the work of genealogists. We have the sense that we are learning right along with the author.

Even World War II is involved because Bertha/Beth’s mother lived in Russia during the war and suffered the depression in America. This had a bearing on why Annie was admitted to Eloise Hospital and never released.

I felt shocked at the anonymous graves of Eloise. It felt shameful that so many people were locked away to die as forgotten as they lived. My opinion went back and forth regarding whether the secret should have been kept.
This story is an informative off the beaten path intrigue that should not be missed. It gets my big thumbs up.

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BOOK REVIEW: Highland Scandal

Posted on May 10, 2009. Filed under: 1 |

An Enjoyable Romance!

An Enjoyable Romance!

Highland Scandal involves “the rake” , Jack Haines, who is on the run from the Prince of Wales for allegedly having an affair with the Princess. A highland lord offers him shelter and protection if he handfasts or marries the lord’s niece. When he meets Lizzy Beal, he is surprised by the fact that she is beautiful until she speaks and reveals that she is a women with intelligence and not afraid to use it. Lizzie has plans of a marriage of her own making and not involving Jack.
I loved how the fireworks flew between Lizzy and Jack. It was definitely moving how they went from loathing to just lusting after each other to really falling in love with each other. I also enjoyed the side story of Lizzy’s sister Charlotte overcoming her obstacles. There was also a true plot in that Lizzy and Charlotte’s uncle is trying to keep Lizzy from marrying because of the land they live on.

I can recommend this story because the plot flowed smoothly along and nicely intertwined with the few romantic scenes. The characters are believable and it is easy to become lost in the actual story of the book. I can safely say that this is enjoyable candy without being too sickly sweet. Those who are not particular followers of romance could find enjoyment in this story, so it gets my big thumbs up.

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BOOK REVIEW: Perfection by Julie Metz

Posted on May 7, 2009. Filed under: 1 |

What I Am Reading Right Now, An ARC!

What I Am Reading Right Now, An ARC!

Pefection is a women’s book, but it could be recommended for anyone who has lost a spouse or is going through a divorce. It is about a woman called Julie Metz who loses her husband due to a brain aneurysm. Six months after his death she discovers that he was unfaithful to her throughout their 12-year marriage, including a long term relationship with one of Julie’s close friends.

On reading this book I could see myself doing all the things Julie did when she lost her husband. I could believe that it was myself discovering the betrayal. The feelings were fierce and powerful. I wanted to throw the book across the room and/or kick Julie’s husband just so that he hurt as badly as Julie did. Only then did I have to pull myself away and say it is only in the book. But if it was myself going through this I can see that it would feel very healing and wonderful to be so understood emotionally throughout these same issues. I can see the book mirroring those lives, which speaks well for this book.

I have more understanding of what it is like to lose a loved one and of how complicated and draining divorce can be. It has opened a window into these issues. This book could only help those involved with death or divorce and is worth reading if you know someone or are related to someone dealing with either death or divorce as it can walk you through to the other side.

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Book Review: This Present Darkness

Posted on May 6, 2009. Filed under: 1 |

In Honor of This Present Darkness

In Honor of This Present Darkness

This Present Darkness was first published in 1986. The edition I read was in its seventeenth printing. It is a book that has proven itself shelf and read worthy by virtue of its universal theme of good versus evil. There are also themes of light versus dark, the big corporation versus small town business, and racketeering/intrigue versus the psychological and spirtual well being of community at large.

On the surface, this is about the small town of Ashton in which things are taking a downhill turn for the worse. The town is slowly leaving its typical activities for more nefarious shadow type dealings. A reporter and a pastor compare notes and discover a plan to control the townspeople and even all humanity.

What is unseen is the holy and demonic battle for all of earths souls. Angels and demons converse concurrently with the townspeople of Ashton. This creates two plots that eventually mesh into high stakes race for souls.

This book kept me turning pages well past my bedtime. It makes praying to God mean something. The book shows horrible consequences for actions that are not well considered. It was as if all the stories of the Bible were complied into one whopper of a meaningful tale. This book gets my big thumbs up as being an insightful morality tale for all.

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New Purchase From Sam’s Club

Posted on May 6, 2009. Filed under: 1 |

The Book Faerie Visited

The Book Faerie Visited

The book faerie visited my cart when we went to Sam’s Club. I came home with Whispers of the Bayou by Mindy Starns Clark. Yippee!

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